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A Path to Coldness of Heart

A Path to Coldness of Heart

The Last Chronicle of the Dread Empire, Vol. 3
By


Trade Paperback - $15.99
Buy at: Amazon, Barnes and Noble, or Powell's

ISBN: 9781597803311
Published: 9/4/2012

Hardcover - $24.99
Buy at: Amazon, Barnes and Noble, or Powell's

ISBN: 9781597803298
Published: 1/3/2012

Ebook
Buy at: Amazon, Barnes and Noble, Powell's, or Baen

ISBN: 9781597803304
Published: 1/3/2012


At long last! The conclusion to Glen Cook’s Dread Empire saga!

King Bragi Ragnarson is a prisoner, shamed, nameless, and held captive by Lord Shih-ka’i and the Empress Mist at the heart of the Dread Empire.

Far away in Kavelin, Bragi’s queen and what remains of his army seek to find and free their king, hampered by the loss or desertion of their best and brightest warriors. Kavelin’s spymaster, Michael Trebilcock, is missing in action, as is loyal soldier Aral Dantice. Meanwhile, Dane, Duke of Greyfells, seeks to seize the rule of Kavelin and place the
kingdom in his pocket, beginning a new line of succession through Bragi’s queen, Dane’s cousin Inger. And in the highest peaks of the Dragon’s Teeth, in the ancient castle Fangdred, the sorcerer called Varthlokkur uses his arts to spy on the world at large, observing the puppet strings that control kings and empires alike, waiting… For the time of the wrath of kings is almost at hand, and vengeance lies along a path to coldness of heart.

“Glen Cook’s dark and gritty series of fantasy novels tracking the history of the mercenary band known as The Black Company had a huge impact on post-Tolkien fantasies. They marked a turn away from Tolkien and back toward such models as Leiber and Howard, and, with their starkly realistic portrayal of soldiers and war, became themselves models for a new generation of epic fantasy writers like Steven Erikson.”
—Paul Witcover, Locus

“Glen Cook is a rare beast of a writer—he can vacillate between military fantasy, space opera, epic fantasy, mystery, and science fantasy with great ease. His writing is often marked by a purity; that he is depicting life in its most real sense, from the thoughts in a character’s mind to the wind rushing across his or her face.”
—Rob H. Bedford, sffworld.com

“Glen Cook has been credited with single-handedly changing the face of fantasy in the late twentieth century. I’d argue with that—there are too many antecedents for contemporary heroic fantasy noir to give credit to one writer. What Cook has done is build on them very effectively, sometimes brilliantly, to the point that if you don’t know Cook, you don’t know fantasy.”
—Robert M. Tilendis, The Green Man Review