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May 2004 Issue -- Contents

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Just a Wild Guess
Posted on Thursday, March 04, 2004 - 11:06 pm:   

THE MAGAZINE OF FANTASY & SCIENCE FICTION
May * 55th Year of Publication

NOVELETS

HOW IT FEELS - Robert Reed
SO GOOD A DAY - Sheila Finch
QUARRY - Peter S. Beagle

SHORT STORIES

KISSING FROGS - Jaye Lawrence
THE MASKED CITY - Melanie Fazi (tr. Brian Stableford)
THE LONG RUN - John Morressy
JEW IF BY SEA - Richard Mueller
SERPENT - James Patrick Kelly

DEPARTMENTS

EDITORIAL - Gordon Van Gelder
BOOKS TO LOOK FOR - Charles de Lint
MUSING ON BOOKS - Michelle West
COMING ATTRACTIONS
FILMS: They Know Action, But They Don't Know Dick - Kathi Maio
F&SF MARKETPLACE
CURIOSITIES: The Divine Comedy of Ariadne and Jupiter, by Shere Hite (1994), and Tetrarch, by Alex Comfort (1980) - Paul di Filippo

COVER BY AARON CAMPBELL FOR "QUARRY"
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Gordon Van Gelder
Posted on Friday, March 05, 2004 - 05:26 am:   

Thank you for posting the May contents before I got around to it.
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tabitha
Posted on Friday, March 05, 2004 - 10:36 am:   

But Gordie also posts the page numbers so we don't get lost thumbing through each issue. :-)
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Alan T. Sippola
Posted on Friday, March 05, 2004 - 12:36 pm:   


Pardon me, but are these the officially confirmed contents of the May issue, or just a wild guess?

Uh, um... sorry. ;-)

~ Alan ~
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Gordon Van Gelder
Posted on Friday, March 05, 2004 - 12:50 pm:   

They're the actual contents of the May issue.
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Alan T. Sippola
Posted on Friday, March 05, 2004 - 01:10 pm:   


With a marvelous lineup like that, it looks like another fantastic issue is waiting in the wings.

Thank you, Gordon. :-)

~ Alan ~
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Gregory Bernard Banks
Posted on Friday, March 05, 2004 - 01:40 pm:   

Oh, cool. An editorial. I really love to hear from Mr. Van Gelder. Wish he'd give editorials more often.
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Alan T. Sippola
Posted on Friday, March 05, 2004 - 05:00 pm:   


Gregory --

If you go to Mervius' "Fantastica Daily" website at http://www.mervius.com or "Locus Online" at http://www.locusmag.com and read the news for Thursday, March 4, 2004, you'll be able to get an advanced reading of Gordon Van Gelder's "Editorial" which will appear in the May issue of F&SF.

Just for the record, Gordon, I mailed my letter this morning.

~ Alan ~
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Jaye Lawrence
Posted on Friday, March 05, 2004 - 05:31 pm:   

Can't wait, can't wait, can't wait!

(This is my first fiction publication, so you have to forgive me babbling like a ninny.)
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Tribeless
Posted on Friday, March 05, 2004 - 05:50 pm:   

You're allowed to babble in that case Jaye. Well done. Look forward to reading your story.
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Gordon Van Gelder
Posted on Saturday, March 06, 2004 - 08:46 am:   

Alan---

Thanks for sending a letter. I'm growing hopeful that we'll see an Isaac Asimov stamp in a couple of years.

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Alan T. Sippola
Posted on Saturday, March 06, 2004 - 02:30 pm:   


My favorite uncle who unfortunately passed away a few years ago, was also a huge fan of Isaac Asimov, as much as I have been for so many years, lived near us on a farm which he and my dad managed. And, he and I were almost always talking about the great knowledge of science which the Good Doctor possessed.

My uncle subscribed to "Science Digest" magazine and would pass those issues on to me when he had finished them, which featured Asimov's articles in them, and we would always begin our great gabfests together talkng about Asimov which would last for hours.

Funny, I can still remember the exact words my uncle said one day when he drove down to the end of the driveway in his pickup truck, picked up his and our mail and brought ours up to the house.
As my uncle handed me the mail at the front door that day, he pointed to the postmarked postage stamps on the letters we received which featured Albert Einstein on them at the time, and said, "You know, Alan, one day this stamp honoring this great thinking man of science will be replaced with Isaac Asimov, an even greater man we can all honor. And you'd better believe it, Alan."

Gordon, to be perfectly honest with you, I can not think of a better person to have inaugurated this letter writing campaign, honoring the memory of the Good Doctor, Isaac Asimov, with a commemorative U.S. postage stamp.

I wish my uncle were still alive.

Thank you, so very much, Gordon.

~ Alan ~
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ET
Posted on Saturday, March 06, 2004 - 05:56 pm:   

> If you go to ... you'll be able to get an advanced reading of Gordon Van Gelder's "Editorial" which will appear in the May issue of F&SF.

And if you got to Fictionwise you'll be able to buy the issue right now. :-) Haven't downloaded it yet, though, so I just went to the Fantastica link and read it. Nice idea. I'm guessing that I couldn't send a letter, not being a US citizen.
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Gordon Van Gelder
Posted on Sunday, March 07, 2004 - 08:40 am:   

ET---

I doubt the USPS throws out letters that aren't from the US. We're lobbying here, not casting votes. International support for an Asimov stamp certainly can't hurt.
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ET
Posted on Sunday, March 07, 2004 - 01:12 pm:   

You know what, since I'm in fact a customer of the USPS, I guess you're right.
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ET
Posted on Sunday, March 07, 2004 - 02:24 pm:   

BTW, you mentioned a letter that should be on the F&SF site, but I couldn't find it.

As for an Asimov's stamp limerick... (lot's of cogs turning, teeth gnashing...)

One night when I was on a camp
A lady who's somewhat a tramp
Said "the future is hot"
So I said "can't say 'not'
When you wear just an Asimov stamp"
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Alan T. Sippola
Posted on Sunday, March 07, 2004 - 03:00 pm:   


The following may be of some benefit to those of you who are unfamiliar with how the U.S. Postal Service's Citizens' Stamp Advisory Committee operates in its selection process of stamp proposals:

US Postal Service's Citizens' Stamp Advisory Committee 

Get your idea for a new stamp considered by the U.S. Post Office

Most of the subjects that appear on U.S. stamps are suggested by the public. A group known as the US Postal Service's Citizens' Stamp Advisory Committee (CSAC), is charged with the task of reviewing ideas for new stamp issues proposed by members of the public. The CSAC is comprised of philatelists, artists, educators, and other experts in their fields. Committee members are appointed by and serve at the pleasure of the Postmaster General. The CSAC is responsible for recommending new stamp subjects and designs to the Postmaster General, based upon its review of public submissions.

Any citizen is welcome to offer ideas for the designs of new U.S. postage stamps, and last year more than 40,000 people did so. The CSAC considers each and every idea submitted, and then makes suggestions to the Postmaster General about stamp designs. More than two dozen designs submitted by the public are accepted annually.

Stamp Subject Selection Criteria

When considering whether to accept a new stamp design, the CSAC is bound by particular criteria enunciated by the US Postal Service, as follows:

1. Generally speaking, U.S. postage stamps should feature only American-related subjects.

2. No living person may be depicted on U.S. postage.

3. Events of historical significance may be considered for commemoration only on anniversaries in multiples of 50 years.

4. Generally, only events and themes of broad national appeal and significance will be considered for commemoration.

5. Stamps may not be issued to honor fraternal, political, sectarian, or service/charitable organizations that exist primarily to solicit and/or distribute funds.

6. Stamps or stationery items may not be issued to honor cities, towns, municipalities, counties, primary or secondary schools, hospitals, libraries, or similar institutions.

7. Stamps may not be issued to honor religious institutions or individuals whose principal achievements are associated with religious undertakings or beliefs.

8. No stamp may be considered for issuance if another stamp treating the same subject has been issued in the past ten years.

How to Submit Your Stamp Proposal

There are no formal procedures for submitting stamp proposal ideas to the CSAC. Simply write a letter outlining your idea and send it to this address:

Citizens' Stamp Advisory Committee
c/o Stamp Development, U.S. Postal Service
475 L'Enfant Plaza, SW, Room 4474E
Washington, D.C.  20260-2437

Proposals for new stamp subjects should be submitted at least three years in advance of the proposed date of issue to allow sufficient time for CSAC consideration and for design and production, should the proposal be accepted. It is important that you explain in your proposal why you think your idea has merit and is likely to be of broad interest to the American general public.

The Review Process

Stamp proposals are reviewed first by the CSAC's subject subcommittee, which first determines whether any particular proposal violates the general selection criteria rules mentioned earlier. If not, the proposal is further evaluated and research may be done on the proposed stamp subject. At this point, the CSAC may reject the proposal or set it aside for further consideration in the future. A member of the public who has submitted a proposal is not ordinarily notified if a subject has been approved for issuance until an announcement is made to the general public, usually about 6 month's prior to the stamp's issuance.  
 
~ Eduardo De Resendes 

Copyright  © 2004 About, Inc. About and About.com are registered trademarks of About, Inc. The About logo is a trademark of About, Inc. All rights reserved.

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ET
Posted on Sunday, March 07, 2004 - 11:03 pm:   

A well endowed actor of smut
Had an Asimov stamp on each nut
He said "If you don't mind
Please start from behind --"
And then the director yelled "Cut!"
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Tribeless
Posted on Monday, March 08, 2004 - 12:03 am:   

You've just got way too much time on your hands at the moment haven't you ET :-)
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ET
Posted on Monday, March 08, 2004 - 01:17 am:   

Just teasing, BTW. The real last line is of course "And then he put one on his butt."

And no, I don't have way too much time. No such thing. Or rather, it's no an issue of the amount of time. The last one was actually developed as I took a shower last night, and was finished this morning as I prepared to go to work (while the time on the post is 11:03pm, it was 9:03am my time). So no real time wasted.

You know, Gordon did ask for them. I couldn't just refuse. I haven't managed to write the one about licking Asimov's back yet, but it's the spirit that counts.
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Alan T. Sippola
Posted on Monday, March 08, 2004 - 12:31 pm:   


"The last one was actually developed as I took a shower last night<snip!>..."

ET --

Perhaps with your incredibly creative and artistic ability, which is second to none, you have developed a beautiful golden voice, and become a MUCH GREATER SINGER in the shower, than a poet? ;-D

~ Alan ~
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ET
Posted on Monday, March 08, 2004 - 01:06 pm:   

No, I can tell you that I definitely haven't developed my singing voice lately. I'm pretty quiet by nature, and I don't want to disturb the neighbours. Although I do have a decent singing voice, given the right song and the right season. So when it comes to disturbing people, I leave that for online forums.

That said, showers do apparently bring something out in me. Just the other day when preparing to take a shower I thought of the line "Sometimes there's nothing as good as having your tonsils taken out by rabid dogs."
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Alan T. Sippola
Posted on Monday, March 08, 2004 - 03:30 pm:   


How 'bout this one I just fabricated, to add to the above?...

"...And then, as if he had been cured by a magic spell cast upon him by a witch, his continuous erotic dreams abruptly ended for him that faithful night, when he awoke in bed, alone in his apartment, with a painful throbbing sensation in his midsection, from the bite of a deadly cobra."

~ Alan ~
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ET
Posted on Tuesday, March 09, 2004 - 01:52 am:   

Nah, didn't do it for me. Apart from "faithful night" -- I liked that.
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Alan T. Sippola
Posted on Tuesday, March 09, 2004 - 03:31 pm:   


"Apart from "faithful night" -- I liked that."

Thank you, ET. :-)

You may color my face red for that accidental brain fart emission, pal.

In my mad rush to type out that sentence for you before scrambling off to work yesterday, I failed to proofread it first, for any mistakes I may have made.

It actually should have read, "fateful night".

~ Alan ~
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ET
Posted on Tuesday, March 09, 2004 - 04:03 pm:   

I figured as much, but still, I found "faithful night" to be thought provoking and lyrical. So even though it was a brain fart, it still smelled of roses (probably colour matched to your face), and I am glad to have had the pleasure of reading it.
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Alan T. Sippola
Posted on Tuesday, March 09, 2004 - 08:00 pm:   


I thank you, very much, Eyal, for your most kind thoughts.

Peace and prosperity to you and to all in "The Holy Land", always, my friend!

God Bless!

~ Alan ~
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John Thiel
Posted on Friday, March 12, 2004 - 03:46 pm:   

Just a little bit of chat while we await the issue.
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Alan T. Sippola
Posted on Sunday, March 21, 2004 - 08:00 pm:   


John --

I think "shootin' the breeze" would have sounded a bit more thought provoking and lyrical in your analysis.


~ Alan ~
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John Thiel
Posted on Thursday, March 25, 2004 - 11:23 am:   

May Issue Here---Peter Space Beagle featured.Your stories were all A-1 this issue.
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Michael Samerdyke
Posted on Saturday, April 03, 2004 - 10:37 am:   

I thought the best story this issue was Robert Reed's "How It Feels." I read the first section and thought it would be an okay story, but then with each additional section and narrator, the story got clearer and funnier, finally ending on the perfect note. This was a very good job.

Of the rest of the stories, I liked "The Long Run" by Morressey. It didn't fulfill all my expectations, but I still found it interesting.
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Matthew
Posted on Sunday, April 11, 2004 - 05:52 pm:   

I just read Quarry. Great story. I really loved it. It seemed oriental, especially with a fox-spirit and the Hunters who are expert at killing with their hands. All the other stories were quite good too.

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